NASA is trying to redirect the path of an asteroid

Image of the article titled NASA is trying to redirect an asteroid's path by smashing a spacecraft into it

clarification: NASA

If, like me, you’re a fan of not being crushed to death by a rock falling from the sky, you should be interested in the mission that NASA launched today with the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. The spacecraft in the front of that rocket is called DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test)This spacecraft will collide directly with the asteroid Demorphos in the hope of redirecting its path.

Now, I am happy to say that this is not done because Dimorphos It actually threatens to hit the ground but because it makes a good test subject. See, Dimorphos is part of a binary pair of asteroids and orbiting the asteroid Didymos, So NASA can see if the effect of DART on Dimorphos affected its orbit around Didymos. He can then use this information to calculate how a similar strike of an asteroid would likely deflect to Earth.

Small and boxy, the spacecraft will hit Demorphos at an astonishing 14,760 miles per hour, speeding along it. Next motor xenon ion thruster, which converts solar energy into gradual but continuous momentum.

Image of the article titled NASA is trying to redirect an asteroid's path by smashing a spacecraft into it

clarification: NASA

An onboard camera and independent navigation software will guide DART to the asteroid’s self-immolation, which will change the asteroid’s orbital speed. About the main asteroid by a fraction of a percentage. But it should affect the orbital period by several minutes, and it will all be confirmed Through notes from the ground.

Image of the article titled NASA is trying to redirect an asteroid's path by smashing a spacecraft into it

clarification: Ted Lopez / Johns Hopkins APL

DART won’t reach the asteroid pair until next September or so, which means you have plenty of time to figure out how to get close if you want a ringside seat.

The ability to distract an asteroid could one day prove to be extremely crucial to the safety of everything that lives on Earth. While, as of now, NASA doesn’t expect an asteroid of this size to hit Earth in the next century or so, there have been 1,200 meteor impacts on Earth from asteroids over three feet tall since 1988, and only 0.42 percent of those — five — It was foreseen in advance.

So it’s not like we really have strong control over this whole thing of asteroid prediction, and finding a way to be ready to cash something would really be a great idea. Ideally, if this test is successful, a similar deflected spacecraft will be available and ready for launch, should the situation arise in the future.

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Olga Dmitrieva

Любитель алкоголя. Возмутитель спокойствия. Интроверт. Студент. Любитель социальных сетей. Веб-ниндзя. Поклонник Бэкона. Читатель

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