The new growth of forests may have caused the mass extinction 360 million years ago

New forest growth may have caused a mass extinction 360 million years ago by fueling the proliferation of massive plankton that absorbed all the oxygen from the oceans — and experts say this is now happening at a faster rate.

  • Sediment records show that new forests caused the Devonian mass extinction
  • There was a correlation between the new growth and the eruption of plankton blooms
  • Experts suggest that new vegetation grew around the world about 360 million years ago
  • This pushes new nutrients into the soil that seep into the oceans in waves
  • This was enough to feed the plankton that grew to huge sizes around the world
  • Then the flowers ate up all the oxygen, suffocating the marine animals

The Devonian mass extinction wiped out 70 percent of life on our planet about 360 million years ago, but what caused this deadly event has remained a mystery — until now.

Animals, mostly marine species, are a result of the Earth’s oceans depleting oxygen, and previous work indicates a volcanic eruption or even a supernova, but a new study finds that new forests have grown in the ancient world.

An international team of scientists has uncovered evidence that fresh plants released nutrients into the seas that feed the blossoms of megafauna, which have gobbled up all the oxygen and choked off anything and everything that lives in salt water.

Separate surveys show hundreds of «dead zones» around the world today where life cannot survive for the same reason that led to the Devonian extinction, and experts say it is «happening at a much faster rate than it was during the Late Devonian Period.»

The mass extinction is one of Earth’s five largest extinctions and has been previously blamed for asteroid impacts, climate change, sea level changes and widespread volcanic activity.

« It is assumed that the progressive volcanic activity was responsible for the intermittent pattern of oceanic hypoxia during the Late Devonian Period, however it is unlikely that the frequency of the volcanic activity was related to the orbital cycles, » the study published in the May issue of the Journal of Earth and Planets states. Scientific messages.

Alternatively, volcanic eruptions may have altered the chemistry of terrestrial environments (for example, soil composting) that could contribute to eutrophication and hypoxia through Earth’s orbital inputs.

However, the team said Within the sciences This volcanic activity may have amplified the extinctions that lasted for about 20 million years.

An international team of scientists has uncovered evidence that fresh plants released nutrients into the seas that nourish the massive algae blooms, which have gobbled up all the oxygen and choked off anything and everything that lives in the saltwater.

An international team of scientists has uncovered evidence that fresh plants released nutrients into the seas that nourish the massive algae blooms, which have gobbled up all the oxygen and choked off anything and everything that lives in the saltwater.

The Devonian mass extinction wiped out 70 percent of the mammals of our planet around 360 million years ago, but what caused this deadly event remains a mystery so far.  Pictured is what our planet looked like about 360 million years ago

The Devonian mass extinction wiped out 70 percent of the mammals of our planet around 360 million years ago, but what caused this deadly event remains a mystery so far. Pictured is what our planet looked like about 360 million years ago

This study investigated the upper Devonian rock from Chattanooga, Tennessee, where they found evidence that new forests over the time period were to blame.

This is a geological formation that stretches across Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri and Tennessee, and is home to a collection of fossils that date back to the Devonian period.

READ  NASA's Curiosity rover video shows a new panoramic view of Mars

Approximately 65 samples were collected from the site and brought to the laboratory to measure the concentrations of particles known to be associated with oxygen levels in the seas, plankton reproduction, plant material, soil and sediment erosion.

The fluctuation of these chemical fingerprints, or «agents,» led to the team’s answer.

They were able to see a correlation when large amounts of nutrients flow into the oceans and when plankton activity increases.

Separate surveys show hundreds of

Separate surveys show hundreds of «dead zones» around the world today where life cannot survive for the same reason that led to the Devonian extinction, and experts say it is «happening much faster than it was during the Late Devonian Period.»

«It is likely that the initial radiation of forests significantly changed terrestrial weathering patterns and released massive amounts of nutrients that were washed from the continents into the ocean,» the study says.

Late Devonian was plagued by intense monsoons causing the growth of new forests around the world.

With plants like these sprouting in a burial, the soil became rich in new nutrients that seep into the oceans in waves and gave birth to huge blooms of plankton that absorbed all the oxygen.

However, the team warns that a similar process is occurring nowadays and appears to be occurring at a much faster rate than about 360 million years ago.

When were the events of the «Big Five» Earth extinguishing?

Traditionally, scientists have referred to the «Big Five» mass extinctions, including perhaps the most famous mass extinction caused by a meteorite collision that brought about the end of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago.

But other major mass extinctions have been the result of phenomena that originated entirely on Earth, and although they are less known, we may learn something from exploring them that could shed light on our current environmental crises.

  1. The late OrdovicianThis ancient crisis about 445 million years ago saw two major waves of extinctions, both of which are caused by climate change associated with the advancement and retraction of ice sheets in the Southern Hemisphere. This makes it the only major extinction associated with global cooling.
  2. Late Devonian: This period is now regarded as a number of «pulsations» of extinction that spread over a period of 20 million years, starting with 380 million years. This extinction has been linked to a major climate change, possibly due to the eruption of the Viluy Traps volcanic region in modern Siberia. Perhaps a large volcanic eruption caused rapid fluctuations in sea levels and decreased levels of oxygen in the oceans.
  3. Middle PermianScientists recently discovered another event 262 million years ago that rivals the «Big Five» in size. This event coincided with the Emeishan eruption in what is now China, and is known to cause simultaneous extinctions in the tropics and higher latitudes.
  4. Late Permian: The Late Permian Mass Extinction of about 252 million years ago dwarfs all other events, with about 96% of the species extinction. The extinction was the result of a large-scale eruption of the Siberian Traps, a massive and prolonged volcanic event that covered much of modern Siberia, resulting in a series of environmental impacts.
  5. Late TriassicThe Late Triassic event, 201 million years ago, shares a number of similarities with the Late Permian event. It was caused by another large-scale volcanic eruption, this time from the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province, which heralded the splitting of the supercontinent Pangea and the initial opening of what would later become the Atlantic Ocean.
READ  NASA announces the death of the Mars driller two years later

Olga Dmitrieva

Любитель алкоголя. Возмутитель спокойствия. Интроверт. Студент. Любитель социальных сетей. Веб-ниндзя. Поклонник Бэкона. Читатель

Добавить комментарий

Ваш адрес email не будет опубликован.

Наверх